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How to restore a leather sofa

Leather is a natural product and can fade, crack and dry out but as long as the hide hasn't been cut or ripped, it's simple to revive.

How to restore a leather sofa

The framework of this old sofa was solid and still comfortable but it had seen a lot of use and the leather was very dry and scratched with little stain left in the seat area.

ADDING MOISTURE

The main problem with most old leather is lack of moisture. Unless recommended by the manufacturer, never use water to clean leather as it dries it out even further. Use a soft brush then saddle soap to remove dirt, grime and dust. To restore suppleness to the fibres, use an equestrian product such as a leather cream.

TIP - Massage in a few coats, buff any residue and leave overnight to absorb.

STAINING OLD LEATHER

For most leather, a clean and polish is all that's required but some may need restaining. Strip any remaining colour and polish. Seal the stain to prevent colour transfer and protect the hide, applying a hide seal lacquer emulsion and leaving it to dry. Finish with a leather cream or light conditioner.

TIP - Buy stain from equestrian retailers and leather suppliers.

leather sofa


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