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13 conditions you think you have - but probably don’t

Health issues in the news can lead to incorrect self-diagnoses - and even a misdiagnosis by a doctor. Here’s what you need to know to get the right information and the right treatment.

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1. Gluten sensitivity
1. Gluten sensitivity
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A spate of celebrities may swear otherwise, but gluten isn’t the devil.

In fact, one recent study found that 86 percent of people who thought they had a gluten sensitivity - characterised by gastrointestinal issues like bloating, diarrhea, joint pain, fatigue, and “brain fog”- didn’t actually have one.

Only around 6 percent of the population has a sensitivity to this protein found in wheat and many processed foods, while a very small 1 percent have celiac disease.

So, if it’s not gluten, what is it? 

Some possibilities include lactose or fructose intolerance, an overgrowth of bacteria in the small intestine, gastroparesis from diabetes, IBS, or another underlying health condition.

Our scientific knowledge is continually evolving – don’t forget that 80 years ago, doctors recommended cigarettes. Here’s the latest information on controversial health topics.



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