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Write it out

Write it out
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Just like talking it out can be therapeutic, so can writing. You don’t even have to make it an official journal, simply jotting down your thoughts on paper can help you feel happier and calmer.

More funny memes, less news

More funny memes, less news
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There is a lot of scary stuff out there about COVID-19 and if I allow myself to get caught up in all of it I’ll lose my mind. I’ve mainly stopped watching the news and instead I love to look at funny memes online. It makes me laugh and reminds me that even though we’re all isolated, we’re still all in this together.

These working from home cartoons are guaranteed to give you a laugh.

Get on social media

Get on social media
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I post and comment on Instagram several times a day. This helps me feel connected with the outside world and stay up on how my friends and family are doing. Social media is often demonised—and it can be bad for your mental health if you’re constantly comparing yourself to some imaginary ideal you see online—but during times like this, it can be a huge help in keeping you connected with your people.

Do whatever you need to do to get through this

Do whatever you need to do to get through this
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People react differently in times of crisis so what works for me may not work for you—and that’s perfectly fine! The important thing is to find what daily things you can do to lift your spirits and stay sane. For some people that could be playing video games, while for others that’s baking cakes, reading books, or planning the vacation (they’ll take next year). As long as you’re not hurting yourself or engaging in addictive behaviours, like alcoholism, there is no wrong way to get through this!

Consider any of these activities for when your entire life has been cancelled.

Reach out to others

Reach out to others
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Everyone, but especially people with mental illnesses, is especially vulnerable during this time of social distancing because of feelings of isolation, neglect, and ostracisation—which can lead to disastrous and even tragic outcomes. I fear that we will see an increase in suicides during this pandemic, likely another side effect of this time. Just as we care for ourselves, it’s just as important to look for others who may be struggling. Be aware of people who are lonely and check in with them often. Worried about yourself or someone harming themselves?

Here’s what you need to know to recognise the signs of depression.

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Source: RD.com

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