Advertisement

Antiques

Antiques
Getty Images

The old wiring of antique appliances makes them a safety risk because the wiring dries and becomes brittle, which could fuel a fire. For those who especially love shopping for vintage light fixtures, it’s imperative to know how old the wiring is, if the wiring has been replaced and where it was wired. Look for a UL (Underwriters Laboratories) label somewhere on the wiring for a quick reference to see if it’s safe. UL tests lighting fixtures for safety.

Laptops

Laptops
Getty Images

Laptops have caused fires in homes in the past. In 2013 a laptop running on a bed for 16 to 18 hours with a recalled battery in a US home contributed to a fire that burned the home down. It seems the battery played the bigger role in igniting the blankets and comforter than the laptop. Most laptops include automatic shutdowns to prevent them from overheating.

9-volt batteries in junk drawers

9-volt batteries in junk drawers
Getty Images

People know a 9-volt battery and some steel wool is a great fire starter. So batteries shouldn’t be kept loose in a junk drawer, especially 9-volt batteries. It’s possible that the metal in the junk drawer could short out a 9-volt battery and spark a fire. It’s best to keep batteries in the packaging or keep the posts covered with tape. Check with local councils on how to best dispose of 9-volt batteries.

Dust bunnies

Dust bunnies
Getty Images

There’s a super important reason why dusting is a vital chore at home. Those dust bunnies when near a spark will ignite and spread a fire quickly. Dust bunnies near a space heater and electrical sockets are a huge fire hazard.

Take the stress out of cleaning with this definitive guide.

Glassware

Glassware
Getty Images

According to a Science Focus article, fishbowls, jam jars and glass door knobs have helped cause home fires in the past. If they stand in direct sunlight the rays from the sun can become concentrated enough to begin combustion.

Exposed lightbulbs

Exposed lightbulbs
Getty Images

Those closet lights that don’t have an enclosure around them pose a fire and safety risk in the home. According to Buell Inspections, under normal circumstances a 60-watt light bulb will not get hotter than 80 degrees Celsius but under some conditions it could reach close to between 145-260 degrees, high enough to ignite things likes table tennis balls, which begin to melt around 55-60 degrees, according to Nittaku, a table tennis equipment manufacturer.

Advertisement

Paper

Paper
Getty Images

It should go without saying that paper is a huge contributor to home fires but it’s the location of those papers that people don’t pay close enough attention to at home. Newspaper in the garage near the gas tank for the lawn mower is a common ignition source. Find a good, secret hiding place for your valuable papers in your home, well away from any ignition sources.

Dryer lint

Dryer lint
Getty Images

Dryer fires are surprisingly common and start when built-up lint near the motor, gas burners or heating elements catch on fire. This fire can then spread to ignite lint in the vent pipe. Make sure you’re regularly cleaning the lint trap in your dryer and the vent pipe.

Massage oil

Massage oil
Getty Images

According to CTV in Canada, massage oils can pose a hidden risk if they seep into towels that don’t get properly cleaned. Some massage oils contain flaxseed or linseed, which have smoke points of around 107 degrees Celsius, and they can remain on towels that get run through a dryer without getting washed first or get left in piles of hot towels.

Barbecues

Barbecues
Getty Images

Make sure your barbecue is not directly underneath any part of the house when grilling and make sure you keep the grease trap clean after uses. If the flame on your barbecue goes out make sure to wait the proper amount of time suggested by the barbecue manufacturer before reigniting the barbecue.

Never miss a deal again - sign up now!

Connect with us: