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Maltese

Maltese
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Whether a Maltese is donning a floor-length glossy coat for the show ring or sporting a puppy cut, you can’t help but be smitten with these fluffy little puppers. “Dressed in all white, their larger-than-life personality is so much bigger than their two- to three-kilo body,” says Demling-Riley. “[But because of] their small stature, families should make sure they can keep a wee pup safe and happy on a day-to-day basis.” With an average lifespan of 12 to 15 years, you’ve got lots of days to hang out with this charming pup. Known for being perfectly proportioned, Maltese were fashion accessories for the lady aristocrats of the Roman Empire. You might see those expressive eyes peeking out of a woman’s sleeve or bosom in paintings depicting that time.

Miniature Pinscher

Miniature Pinscher
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“Contrary to popular belief, the Min Pin is not the ‘mini’ version of the Doberman Pinscher,” explains Demling-Riley. “However, they do share a common trait – they both have a huge and outgoing personality.” They also resemble a Doberman Pinscher with their pointy ears and bobbed tail, and the coats of some Min Pins are black and tan like the Dobie. But the Min Pin is cool in its own right. It lives longer, for starters – 12 to 16 years – and then there’s that swagger. There’s no mistaking the cocky high-stepping walk of the Min Pin! It’s all good, though, because back at home, this dog is a playful and enthusiastic companion.

 

Papillon

Papillon
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A Papillon gives off a foo-foo air with its polished appearance, but behind those spirited eyes lies a hardy and playful pup. “With a personality as large as their ears, Papillons tend to be the party pup in the room,” says Demling-Riley. “The breed thrives in social settings and excels at agility, obedience, public manners, and even retrieving.” They adapt to warm or cool climates and can be happy in the city or the country, and they’re happy to play with toys indoors or chase squirrels in the backyard. Maybe being content in all scenarios is what helps the Papillon live up to 16 years.

Pomeranian

Pomeranian
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Not only do Poms rank high among pups with the longest dog life spans (they can live up to 16 years), but they also retain their fox-like adorableness well into their senior years. Like many breeds of the spitz family, “Pomeranians are full of energy and fiercely loyal,” Dr Harris says. Their spitz genes also give them loads of snuggle-worthy floof, giving them a heftier appearance, but Poms weigh less than three kilos and are only about 25 centimetres tall. Their pint-size stature doesn’t alter their confidence, though. They strut their stuff like a confident big dog and can be a little cocky and aggressive. But when they’re with their humans, they’re all warm and friendly.

On the other hand, here’s how to know if your dog is secretly in need of some alone time.

 

Poodle (toy)

Poodle (toy)
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Poodles come in three delightful sizes: standard, miniature, and toy. The toy is just 25 centimetres tall and is light as a feather, weighing about 2.5 kilos. Poodles – of all varieties – were the number one dog breed from 1960 to 1982. Today they rank seven on the AKC’s popular breed chart. Their continued popularity is no secret. Poodles are hopelessly devoted to their families and friendly to strangers, other dogs, and pets. Not to mention, they’ll be a loyal companion for 12 to 14 years. Plus, they’re wicked smart. “Poodles are highly intelligent dogs, and they tend to be extremely intuitive,” says Dr Harris. Did we mention how smart these little whippersnappers are?

Here are 10 things dogs can smell that humans can’t.

Rat Terrier

Rat Terrier
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Legend has it that the Rat Terrier got its name from US President Teddy Roosevelt, who had a mixed terrier breed that helped combat the rat infestation in the White House. Yet “rat” hardly seems appropriate for this dog with an adorable and friendly face. Still, it is a feisty and stubborn canine. “A true terrier breed, these opinionated pups need to know ‘why’ they should listen before they actually respond,” says Demling-Riley. “Consistent boundaries, obedience training, and positive reinforcement ensure they reach their full potential.” And since they can live 12 to 18 years, they have plenty of time to reach that full potential.

 

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Shih Tzu

Shih Tzu
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When you live with a Shih Tzu, it’s a long-lasting mutual love affair that will last 10 to 18 years. “Shih Tzus are great family dogs. They love to be loved and give it back very easily,” says Dr Harris. That could be why they’re the 20th most popular dog breed on the annual AKC list. Or maybe it’s because they’re oh-so-snuggly as lap dogs and have endearing, sweet expressions you could get lost in for days. Take them out for a walk and they’ll charm everyone they meet in human or furry form.

 

West Highland White Terrier

West Highland White Terrier
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It’s a pretty big name for a little dog that hails from Scotland. Like most small dogs, the Westie has a big personality, with a touch of stubbornness and admirable independence…except for when you call them and they ignore you. But all is forgiven when that irresistibly cute face comes back to boop you in the nose. Demling-Riley says they adapt well to most living situations, but they do best with children over 10 years of age. You can’t blame a pooch who doesn’t have a lot of tolerance for a kid pulling on their tail or messing with their floof.

Check out which dog breeds make the best pets for kids.

Yorkshire Terrier

Yorkshire Terrier
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Since 1995, Yorkies have been a top 10 breed, according to the AKC. And it’s easy to see why so many people are smitten with these adorable nuggets. They have a long list of admirable qualities – including a life expectancy of 11 to 15 years. “They make excellent ‘purse’ dogs,” Dr Harris says, averaging three kilos and 20 centimetres tall. Like many terriers, Yorkies are spunky, lively, and at times mischievous. They are also eager to please and extremely food motivated, adds Dr Harris. Maybe that’s why they learn new tricks so easily. But they tend to get bored quickly and come up with their own form of entertainment – like hiding your socks.

Now learn about the 13 best medium dog breeds.

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Source: rd.com

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