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Dementia

Dementia
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Before you panic, there’s some good news: “The vast majority of people who are healthy will not have a degenerative neurological condition causing short-term memory loss,” says Dr Lyden. But dementia or Alzheimer’s is a possibility in some groups. If you’re over 60 and have risk factors like diabetes, high blood pressure or obesity, then you may be more prone to problems and need to be evaluated, he says.

Check out the five obvious signs of dementia this woman missed in her own mother.

Medication

Medication
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If you lead a healthy lifestyle, eat right, exercise, and go easy on alcohol and other substances that can harm memory, yet you still feel like your memory if failing, talk to your doctor about your medications – prescription and over-the-counter, advises Dr Lyden. Cholesterol drugs, painkillers, high blood pressure pills and sleeping pills are among the drugs that can trigger memory issues.

Here are the questions you should be asking your pharmacist when filling a new prescription.

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism
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When you have an underactive thyroid, everything in your body runs slower. Your digestion will slow and you can become constipated; cell growth slows and can lead to hair loss; your metabolism becomes sluggish, triggering weight gain. And you may be plagued by muddied thinking or forgetfulness. Often, medication to restore thyroid hormones can help alleviate symptoms and help you feel better all over.

Here are 9 thyroid symptoms to watch out for.

A poor diet

A poor diet
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Inflammation is bad for your body and your brain. “The higher the inflammation levels in your body, the worse your memory will be,” says Dr Amen. Eating an anti-inflammatory diet, like the Mediterranean diet, and avoiding foods that increase it (highly processed foods, loads of sugar) is key. He also recommends taking fish oil and probiotics.

Here are 10 proven ways to fight inflammation. 

When to seek help

When to seek help
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Along with the self-test mentioned earlier, think about how you perceive your short-term memory. Ask yourself: Is it getting progressively worse? Is it worse than 10 years ago? Are other people noticing a problem? “Those are things you should take seriously,” says Dr Amen.

Next, check out the everyday habits that reduce your risk of dementia.

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Source: RD.com

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