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Be smart about allergies

Be smart about allergies
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“Pillows and bed coverings advertised as ‘hypoallergenic’ aren’t necessarily worth buying. That just means a product is made out of a substance you can’t be allergic to, not that it prevents allergies. Instead, get dustmite-proof covers for your pillow, mattress, and box spring.”

Allergist Dr Jacqueline Eghari-Sabet

Heat up to keep your cool

Heat up to keep your cool
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“A hot bath will increase your skin temperature, which eventually decreases your core body temperature. Do the same thing for yourself that you’d do for a young child – make sure you take a bath a half hour or so before bed time.”

Robert Oexman

Tamp down hot flashes

Tamp down hot flashes
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“If you wake up with hot flashes, of course you should keep the room cool and wear layered sleep clothing. But also keep a glass of ice water by the bed; sipping it will help lower your body temperature so you can get back to sleep.”

Dr Becky Wang-Cheng, coeditor of Menopause

Here are nine surprising postmenopausal health risks you can’t ignore. 

Reduce use of technology

Reduce use of technology
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“The cooler white and blue light emitted by a computer monitor stimulates brain activity and makes it difficult for your brain to wind down. Download the software at stereopsis.com/flux. It gradually dims your screen at sundown, shifting your monitor’s colours to warmer red hues.”

Time-management coach Colin Grey

“Watching TV at night may seem relaxing, but it beams light into your eyes, which is an ‘alert’ signal for the brain. Read a book before bed instead.”

Psychiatrist Dr Tara Brass

Here are 13 ways your mobile phone affects body and mind. 

Avoid ‘anti-sleeping’ pills containing caffeine

Avoid ‘anti-sleeping’ pills containing caffeine
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“A lot of people take bedtime pain relievers that contain caffeine and don’t even realise it. Check the label: caffeine is always listed as an active ingredient.”

Jan Engle, professor of pharmacy

“An oral decongestant might help you breathe better, but it can increase your heart rate, which makes it hard to sleep. A nasal decongestant can rev you up too. At night, try a saline spray or wash instead.”

Pharmacist Eric Alvarez

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Source: RD.com

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