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True or false: Cold weather makes you sick

True or false: Cold weather makes you sick
AFRICA STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK

FALSE! Germs are the only thing that can make you sick. You can go out in the freezing cold with wet hair, and if there aren’t any germs around, you’ll stay sniffle-free. But there is a correlation: The viruses that cause the common cold thrive in low temperatures.

True or false: Not all heart attacks involve chest pain

True or false: Not all heart attacks involve chest pain
IGORSTEVANOVIC/SHUTTERSTOCK

TRUE! A 2012 study of more than 1.1 million heart attack patients found that 31 per cent of men and 42 per cent of women didn’t have any chest pain before being hospitalised. The American Heart Association recommends calling an ambulance for other symptoms, too, including shortness of breath, light-headedness, and pain elsewhere in the upper body.

Here are some more silent signs of a heart attack you might be ignoring.

True or false: Being overweight shortens your life expectancy

True or false: Being overweight shortens your life expectancy
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FALSE! It’s what researchers call the “obesity paradox,” though the “overweight paradox” would be more accurate. Obesity is linked with a host of health problems, including so-called all-cause mortality, but the evidence isn’t strong for those who are overweight. A recent review looked at ten studies of more than 190,000 people and found that overweight people had the same longevity as normal-weight adults, though they did have a higher risk of heart disease.

True or false: You shouldn’t ice a burn

True or false: You shouldn’t ice a burn
SPALNIC/SHUTTERSTOCK

TRUE! Most skin damage from a burn comes from the inflammatory response, and ice can damage cells and make it worse. Instead, immerse the burn in cool water for about five minutes. Then wash with mild soap and apply an antibiotic ointment.

True or false: Antiperspirants cause cancer

True or false: Antiperspirants cause cancer
OLENA YAKOBCHUK/SHUTTERSTOCK

FALSE! Antiperspirants temporarily keep sweat from escaping, and some scientists have suggested that letting it build up in the ducts could cause tumours. But research hasn’t confirmed that theory and the largest study to date on the subject found no link between cancer and antiperspirants or deodorants.

 

True or false: CPR doesn’t require mouth-to-mouth breathing

True or false: CPR doesn’t require mouth-to-mouth breathing
RAWPIXEL.COM/SHUTTERSTOCK

TRUE! A 2017 study found that when bystanders gave CPR to people in cardiac arrest, survival rates were higher when they employed uninterrupted chest compressions rather than pausing for rescue breaths.

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True or false: Eating too much sugar will give you diabetes

True or false: Eating too much sugar will give you diabetes
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FALSE! Sweet foods don’t directly lead to chronically high blood sugar. But they can contribute to obesity, which is a risk factor for diabetes, so keeping a well-balanced diet and limiting treats is still the right idea.

Learn the truth about more healthy-eating and food myths you still believe.

True or false: You shouldn’t let someone with a concussion sleep right away

True or false: You shouldn’t let someone with a concussion sleep right away

TRUE! For several hours after the initial blow, it’s a good idea to keep the person awake and monitor symptoms. But after that, taking naps and getting plenty of sleep at night are recommended to aid recovery.

True or false: Tilt your head back if you have a nosebleed

True or false: Tilt your head back if you have a nosebleed
PROSTOCK-STUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK

FALSE! Tilting your head back might make you swallow blood, which could irritate the stomach and potentially make you vomit. Instead, tip your head slightly forwards and pinch your nose shut for ten minutes.

True or false: You should eat several small meals throughout the day instead of three big ones

True or false: You should eat several small meals throughout the day instead of three big ones
CASANISA/SHUTTERSTOCK

FALSE! While some people who are natural grazers might do better on a small-meal eating plan, others won’t feel satisfied, and the diet will backfire. The goal should be to pay attention to the overall nutrients and calories you’re getting in your meals, not to how you’re spreading them out.

Learn the truth about 7 widespread health debates of our generation.

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