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10. Pig Beach, The Bahamas

10. Pig Beach, The Bahamas
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The only inhabitants of Big Major Cay are wild pigs, known most famously for swimming in the sea, a phenomenon that draws tourists to the island off Exuma for an encounter and photo opp.

In 2017, a wave of pig deaths struck Pig Beach.

While a combination of factors likely lead to their death, reports National Geographic, the government banned visitors from feeding the creatures.

11. Cinque Terre, Italy

11. Cinque Terre, Italy
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When the sun hits the bright houses on the cliff side of the Italian Riviera, tourists whip their cameras out for the perfect shot of architectural and natural beauty.

Cinque Terre’s idealistic setting has increased the numbers of visitors to the area in recent years.

The rise of tourism in the area has “taken a toll on the infrastructure of the towns and visitors have been injured in landslides on separate occasions,” Jet Cost told Harper’s Bazaar.

While there are currently no restrictions set in place, authorities have discussed putting a cap on tourists allowed in the five villages per year, possibly 1.5 million; the area currently sees about 2.4 million tourists per year.

12. The Isle of Skye, Scotland

12. The Isle of Skye, Scotland
12. The Isle of Skye, Scotland

One of the most picturesque places in the United Kingdom, The Isle of Skye is known for its rugged landscapes, quaint fishing villages, and medieval castles.

Crossing the Skye Bridge to the island from Scotland’s northwest coast is a test of patience these days, with hoards of people packed in caravans, motorhomes, and cars, often in stand-still traffic.

Visitors without prior booking accommodations have found themselves in a pickle.

According to authorities, tourists often arrive at the police station with nowhere to stay asking for advice.

Many end up staying the night in their car.

Local authorities have taken note, advising visitors to use “common sense” before travelling to the island for an overnight stay.

13. Mallorca, Spain

13. Mallorca, Spain
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In 2017, a reported ten million travellers visited Mallorca, up from just six million in 2010, according to the European Union Regional Development Fund.

With stunning beach resorts, sheltered coves, limestone mountains, Roman and Moorish ruins and top-notch nightlife, it’s no surprise this island in the Mediterranean is such a draw.

However, the increase in tourism has resulted in an “extreme environmental crisis” and the “commercialisation of the landscape, environment, and heritage,” as noted by local group Ciutat.

As a result, officials double the tourism tax to €4 per person per day, which is added to hotel stays.

According to Pilar Carbonell, the Balearic’s director of tourism, the funds “support a sustainable model so that tourism to the islands benefits local communities.”

14. Santorini, Greece

14. Santorini, Greece
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One of the Cyclades islands in the Aegean Sea, Santorini is outfitted with whitewashed, cubiform houses tucked into cliffs overlooking the sea.

The fascination of this Grecian delight is not lost on visitors.

One of its many splendors is that the whole complex of Santorini islands is still an active volcano, thought to be the only one in the world whose crater is in the sea.

At just 29 square miles, Santorini has become one of the country’s most popular destinations, so much so that the island has suffered from rising water and energy consumption.

According to Mayor Nikos Zorzos, “It’s a radical rise and we are forever playing catch-up. We have built numerous desalination plants and are in the process of erecting the biggest one in Greece, but in five years’ time I worry even that won’t be enough.”

In order to cut down the number of visitors, Santorini restricted the amount of cruise ship visitor numbers to 8,000 per day in 2017.

15. Mount Everest

15. Mount Everest
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Despite the 2015 Nepal earthquake that closed Mount Everest to the thrill seekers looking to climb the mountain’s treacherous slopes, Mount Everest saw 36,694 visitors passing through the Everest region in 2016.

The Sherpa guides have suffered the consequences, however, as they are the ones tasked with collecting the gross amounts of waste left behind by tourists.

They even threatened to go on strike in an effort to receive higher wages for their dangerous job.

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Source: RD.com

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