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Assuming cleanliness equals healthiness

Assuming cleanliness equals healthiness
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“A common sex mistake people make is mistaking good hygiene for good health,” says Noni Ayana, a sexologist and founder of E.R.I.S. Consulting LLC. But just because your partner may appear clean and attractive on the outside, doesn’t mean they’re free of STDS. Plenty of STDs don’t show outward symptoms. A healthy sex life should include ongoing dialogue between sexual partners discussing a plan on how to keep each other safe and healthy.

Hitting this one super-painful spot on women

Hitting this one super-painful spot on women
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The fourchette is the thin area of skin across the bottom of the vaginal opening and is, by far, the most common place women experience pain during intercourse, says Nicole Prause, PhD, a sex expert at Liberos LLC. “Couples seem to overwhelmingly focus on penetration and pounding, and sexual positions often are not mindful of creating extra friction across this sensitive area, causing it to burn, swell and even rip,” she says. The remedy? Lots and lots of foreplay, checking in regularly during sex and stopping anything that’s causing pain.

Stopping sex if the man loses oomph

Stopping sex if the man loses oomph
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“I have no idea why the myth persists that an erect penis must stay erect to show interest. Sex that is focused on pleasure is likely to explore many different types of pleasure, including relaxing pleasure, like a massage and comforting touch, like hugs,” Prause says. “An erection alone does not mean that it is ‘penetration time’ and is not the only indicator of what a guy might want. Just as with women: ask.”

Not making eye contact

Not making eye contact
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Staring deeply into each other’s eyes may be a staple of romance movies but is one of those things that can feel deeply awkward in real life. “Prolonged eye contact can be uncomfortable, making you look away or laugh, but if you do, you’re missing a chance to deepen your sexual connection, says Davia Frost, sex and intimacy coach at of Frosted Pleasure. “Looking someone in eyes isn’t just about respect – it’s also about connection and vulnerability,” she says. “This does take a certain amount of courage and feeling safe but it will come with practice.”

These are 12 signs you need to visit an eye doctor. 

Forgetting what the biggest sex organ is

Forgetting what the biggest sex organ is
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Nope, it’s not what you’re thinking! The biggest organ in your body and one that’s integral to good sex is your skin. “The skin covers 22 square feet and has 1,000 nerve endings per square inch, allowing for nearly endless sensation,” says Jessi Leader, a licensed marriage and family therapist in Minneapolis. “Instead of going straight for the game-winning goal, take time to stretch, warm-up, practice, become energized and communicate. Sex will feel much more powerful and intimate if you are able to slow the process down in order to touch, feel and explore each other’s bodies,” she advises.

Forgetting to follow up

Forgetting to follow up
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What happens after sex can be just as important as what happens during sex. Once sex is over, you might be tempted to get up and go about your business or fall asleep, but putting a little effort in afterward can pay off big time. “Sex can be a very strong physical bonding experience and following it up with a short conversation can help you increase your emotional bond as well,” Bennett says. If your life between the sheets has seen better days, you’re not alone.

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Source: RD.com

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