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13 Mind-Blowing Facts That Make Watching Star Wars Even Better

Which Star Wars character was gender-swapped, which was almost a monkey, and how George Lucas made the most expensive bet of his life.

13 Mind-Blowing Facts That Make Watching Star Wars Even Better
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Take a peek behind the scenes of this classic series.

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1. Luke Skywalker was almost a girl
1. Luke Skywalker was almost a girl
Wikimedia

A long time ago (January 1975, to be exact) a fledgling screenwriter named George Lucas was working on the second draft of an epic sci-fi space opera he called Adventures of the Starkiller, Episode One: The Star Wars.

Of the many, many problems with this clunky script that would eventually become Star Wars: A New Hope, one that seemed easily fixed to Lucas was the serious lack of female characters.

So, Lucas did something radical: rewrote his story’s main character, Luke Starkiller, as an 18-year-old girl.

At least one concept drawing by artist Ralph McQuarrie exists of this short-lived gender swap, but a few months later, with Lucas’ next draft, Starkiller was a boy again.

Too bad… Star Wars could probably use a few more female voices.



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