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BPA increases diabetes risk

BPA increases diabetes risk
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A report issued by the US Endocrine Society indicates that exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) – like BPA – can raise your risk of diabetes. The group pointed to numerous studies, including a long-term epidemiological study which tied EDCs to type 2 diabetes. Find out what’s new and what’s next when it comes to the treatment of diabetes.

BPA irritates your bowels

BPA irritates your bowels
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A recent study shows that BPA has been associated with irritable bowel disease, by negatively impacting gut microbial amino acid metabolism. Irritable bowel disease is a collection of diseases that includes ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Exposure to BPA was also found to increase the levels of several compounds that drive colon inflammation. Here are 12 other reasons why your belly might be bloated.

BPA contributes to heart disease

BPA contributes to heart disease
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Early research suggests that BPA can harm the heart and arteries, leading to troubles like arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeat) and atherosclerosis (build-up of plaque on the artery walls). Head here to find out how to take control of your heart health.

BPA-free may be B.S.

BPA-free may be B.S.
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While it’s tempting to believe BPA-free plastics will solve these problems, the truth is more complicated. A recent study examined more than 450 BPA-free products going through ordinary wear and tear, such as microwaving, dishwashing and sunlight exposure. More than 95 percent emitted chemicals that acted like oestrogen – just like BPA. “So while BPA is on its way out, the fact is that the replacements to BPA just haven’t been studied well and may have similar effects,” says Casper. “In fact, BPS, a popular plastic replacement for BPA in water bottles, does not have to be labelled and, once ingested, behaves much the same way as BPA.” Consider upgrading to non-toxic, stainless steel food containers for packed lunches and leftovers, with silicone lids. Compared to plastic, silicone lasts longer, stands up better against heat and cold, and is more ocean-friendly – plus it’s odourless, stain-resistant, hypoallergenic, and has no open pores to harbour harmful bacteria. Plus, they’re dishwasher and oven safe. Here are 35 things food manufacturers won’t tell you.

Linked to genital birth defects

Linked to genital birth defects
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Rodent studies show that prenatal exposure to some phthalates, another chemical found in plastic, can disrupt normal male reproductive tract development, causing undescended testicles and testicular abnormalities. Phthalates are also linked to hypospadias, a condition in which the opening of the penis is on the underside rather than the tip. If you are expecting, it’s especially wise to avoid plastic.

Heat and plastic don’t mix

Heat and plastic don’t mix
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According to Harvard medical experts, when food is wrapped in plastic – or placed in a plastic container and microwaved – BPA and phthalates may leak into the food. They note that migration is likely to be greater with fatty foods, such as meats and cheeses. “Heated plastic leaches chemicals 55 times faster, so whether you’re reheating a plate in the microwave, putting hot food in a storage container, or using a plate that’s been run through a hot dishwasher, you’re upping your chance of chemical leaching,” says Casper. If you want to microwave leftovers, choose a glass dish like Pyrex and leave the BPA-free lid off just to be safe. Find out the 4 things you should never really microwave.

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Bottled water is full of microplastic

Bottled water is full of microplastic
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Large pieces of plastic break down into microplastics. A recently released study tested 259 water bottles from 11 brands sold across nine countries. The findings? A whopping 93 percent of those tested contained microplastic contamination – at an average of 10.4 plastic particles per litre of water. That’s double the plastic contamination found in tap water. Of these plastic particles, 65 percent were “fragments” of plastic, including the plastic used to make the bottle caps. Make the switch to reusable stainless steel water bottles; as an added bonus, their double-wall insulated design will keep your beverages cold for 24 hours or hot up to 12 hours.

Phthalates could stunt brain growth

Phthalates could stunt brain growth
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A study published in The Journal of Neuroscience found that phthalates could alter the brains of rats. The team found when pregnant mothers were fed food spiked with phthalates, their offspring had significant lack of both neurons and synapses in the medial prefrontal cortex, which is involved in such high-level cognitive functions as memory, decision-making, error detection, conflict monitoring and cognitive flexibility.

Plastic promotes Alzheimer’s disease

Plastic promotes Alzheimer’s disease
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“Plastic promotes the formation of toxic brain proteins linked to the development of Alzheimer’s disease,” says Jennie Ann Freiman MD, author of The SEEDS Plan, a book inspired by her own mother’s Alzheimer’s disease. “The brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease are riddled with plastic deposits. Anyone with brain fog or impaired thinking should take note.” Find out the 13 common illnesses that have been linked to Alzheimer’s.

Your shoes could be toxic

Your shoes could be toxic
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Sporting the trendiest plastic shoes this season? They may put you at risk of long-term health problems, according to a study titled “Chemicals Up Close” by the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation (SNCC). They found plastic-based flip-flops and sandals have “disturbing concentrations” of harmful chemicals including phthalates. Even if you aren’t worried about the chemicals leeching into your skin, there’s also the environmental impact of disposing of these shoes when style trends change again.

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