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Sticky prune and ginger teabread

The texture of this irresistible teabread is a mixture of crumbly ginger–spiced cake and a sticky, sweet prune purée that is rippled through it. The teabread keeps well – in fact, it improves after being stored for a day or two – and is a good choice for an energy–giving lunch box sweet.

Sticky prune and ginger teabread

Ingredients

  • 1 cup (220 g) pitted prunes, coarsely chopped
  • 100 ml strong Earl Grey tea, cooled
  • 115 g unsalted butter
  • ⅓ cup (80 g) soft brown sugar
  • ¼ cup (90 g) golden syrup
  • 2 cups (300 g) self–raising flour
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 egg, beaten
  • 90 ml low–fat milk
  • ⅓ cup (75 g) glacé ginger, chopped

Preparation

  1. Preheat the oven to 160°C.
  2. Use baking paper to line a large loaf tin measuring 23 × 13 × 6 cm.
  3. Place the prunes and tea in a small saucepan and bring to the boil.
  4. Reduce the heat, cover the pan and simmer gently for about 10 minutes, or until almost all of the liquid has been absorbed.
  5. Tip the prunes into a food processor or blender and process to a fairly smooth purée.
  6. Set aside.
  7. Place the butter, sugar and golden syrup in a saucepan and heat gently until just melted and smooth.
  8. Remove from the heat.
  9. Sift the flour, baking powder and cinnamon into a large bowl and make a well in the centre.
  10. Add the warm syrup mixture, the egg and milk, and beat well to mix thoroughly.
  11. Reserve about 1 tablespoon of the chopped ginger and stir the rest into the cake mixture.
  12. Spoon about one–third of the cake mixture into the prepared tin and spread over the bottom.
  13. Top with about half the prune purée, spreading it into an even layer.
  14. Add another third of the cake mixture and spread out evenly, then spread the remaining prune purée over that.
  15. Finally, spoon the remaining batter on top and smooth it out.
  16. Sprinkle the reserved chopped ginger over the surface of the cake.
  17. Bake for 1–1¼ hours, or until well risen, golden brown and firm to the touch.
  18. Cool in the tin for about 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack and leave to cool completely.
  19. Wrap in foil and store for at least 24 hours before slicing.
  20. The teabread will keep for up to a week.

MAKES 1 LOAF, TO CUT INTO 12 SLICES
Preparation: 30-35 minutes
Cooking: 1-1½ hours



Source:

Light bites & lunches

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