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Riddle: Say my name

Riddle: Say my name
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Hard riddles like this one require you to think logically or in a straightforward way. At the same time, it’s employing a conceptual metaphor with the notion of something disappearing. The answer seems so simple – but not until you’ve figured it out! Before that moment, it’s got your brain in a twist.

Answer: Silence

Riddle: Maths time

Riddle: Maths time
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You might start doing some elaborate fractions but hard riddles like this are sometimes much more about word play than crunching the numbers. Think literally and the answer may just appear right before your eyes.

Answer: IV, the Roman numeral for four, which is “half” (two letters) of the word five. Take this quiz to see if you’re a genius.

Riddle: Find the key

Riddle: Find the key
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This one tricks you by having you think about space that can be entered. Then it gets you to merge that with a space without rooms where you can’t leave. You might even be hung up on those keys. That’s where you should linger. Think about that word. What are some other meanings of “keys” – especially that don’t require locks?

Answer: A keyboard

Riddle: Beachy keen

Riddle: Beachy keen
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This one has a simple answer even though it stumps most people who try to figure it out. Wet and dry seem like they always have to be opposite, so you might get tripped up. Think of an object that can, ahem (hint!) absorb or be both.

Answer: A towel.

Riddle: Literally speaking

Riddle: Literally speaking
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Some hard riddles trip you up by sending you to the easiest answer first. You got this one easy, right? Twenty-six – if you’re talking English alphabet. Not so fast. Take another look and get super simple and straightforward.

Answer: There are 11 letters in the words “the alphabet”

Riddle: Family affair

Riddle: Family affair
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Riddles try to send your train of thought off in scattered directions. Try to stay clear and just follow the logic. Using letters as placeholders for names like “Uncle Bob” or “Aunt Linda” makes straightforward relationships seem difficult.

Answer: A is D’s aunt. Here are more brain teasers that will leave you stumped.

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Riddle: Line up

Riddle: Line up
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This super hard question asks you to determine the relationship between the letters. They seem random: a vowel, two consonants from the tail of the alphabet, two from the front, then two more. What could they mean? What’s the pattern? In this case, think of common strings of words to get you closer. But it still seems almost impossible to hit on the solution.

Answer: E N T (Each letter represents the first letter in the written numbers: One, Two, Three, Four, Five, etc.).

Riddle: Yours or mine

Riddle: Yours or mine
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The key to this riddle to think of anything else but an actual object. Use your critical thinking skills to get conceptual on this one.

Answer: Your name.

Riddle: Number line

Riddle: Number line
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The maths nerds may start thinking about prime numbers or whether seven is divisible by this or that or if it can be cubed and all that. Avoid thinking about math altogether and think about the literal quality of the words that signify the numbers. Remember that riddles play with the differences between the literal and the conceptual, or the straightforward and the complex. For this riddle, think simple, but pivot to a paradigm separate from numbers.

Answer: Seven has two syllables and the other numbers only have one syllable.

Riddle: Out to lunch

Riddle: Out to lunch
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Hard riddles get you used to thinking about metaphors and concepts. Not this one; keep it simple and literal to get to the solution. But ask yourself who or what the “you” is.

Answer: A fishhook

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