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BYOF (bring your own food)

BYOF (bring your own food)
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Unless the idea of a wilted aeroplane sandwich or waiting in a long line for a greasy burger excites you, it’s best to travel with your own food. “Airport food is notoriously overpriced and nutritious options are hard to find,” says Betsey Banker, owner of the travel blog Midlife Millennials and former wellness educator. “I plan ahead and bring my own snacks or meals. Nuts, fruits, and veggies are all good options. On a regular basis, I take my own salad in a sealed bag. Bringing your own food allows you to eat on your own schedule and according to your own dietary preferences, which is especially important on long days of travel, when you’re moving between time zones and when you have short connections.” Head here for more great strategies to save money at the airport.

Choose seats wisely

Choose seats wisely
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You may think you’ve read the seat map correctly, only to find out you’re seated right next to the bathroom, have less legroom thanks to an equipment box, or inadvertently booked a seat without a moveable armrest (therefore reducing seat width). “Refer to website Seat Guru when booking your seats on your flight,” says Victoria Langmead, Safari Expert for travel company Scott Dunn. You’ll be able to consult a seat map for each specific aircraft and determine the ideal seat selection for your preferences.” Check out the 7 hidden features on aeroplanes you never knew existed.

Visit an airport lounge

Visit an airport lounge
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Whether you have a long layover or need to hop on a conference call in peace, an airport lounge can be your safe haven from all the chaos. “Take advantage of the airport lounges, because they’ll make your travel experience much less stressful,” says Yuichi Nishiyama, a pilot for All Nippon Airways. “Not only are lounges a nice place to retreat from the hustle and bustle happening at the gates, but they have a variety of services from dining to shower facilities to designated workspaces.” If you haven’t racked up enough airline status or your credit card doesn’t give you access, then many airlines will allow you to purchase a day pass. Find out the travel tips that are no longer true.

Hydrate ahead of time

Hydrate ahead of time
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There’s a reason your lips feel chapped, your nose and throat feel dry, and your hands turn scaly on a flight – according to the Cleveland Clinic, roughly half of the air circulating in the cabin is pulled from outside air, and at 35,000 feet that air has very little moisture. “I always make sure to hydrate well before a flight,” says Anisa Alhilali, who co-owns the blog Two Travelling Texans and has stamps from 41 countries in her passport. “I try to drink as much water as possible for 24 hours before I travel. I also make sure to have water with me on the plane. It’s best to bring your own refillable water bottle, and fill it up after going through security, since buying water at the airport can be expensive.” Avoiding caffeine and alcohol on your flight will also help keep you hydrated. Now before you board, check out these 34 things pilots won’t tell you.

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Source: RD.com

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