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Answer: C. What appears here to be a bald spot ringed by red bumps is actually a moving mosaic of 30-mile-wide ice islands, perpetually rising and sinking from a reservoir deep below Pluto’s surface.

The bumps?

Frozen crust, shoved aside as the ice spreads about as quickly as your fingernails grow.

NASA’s unmanned New Horizons probe, launched in 2006, has traveled three billion miles for shots like these.

Data from this July 2015 flyby of the former planet, now an “ice dwarf,” was expected to finally finish uploading to Earth March 2017. (And you thought your Wi-Fi was slow.)

Answer: C. What appears here to be a bald spot ringed by red bumps is actually a moving mosaic of 30-mile-wide ice islands, perpetually rising and sinking from a reservoir deep below Pluto’s surface.

The bumps?

Frozen crust, shoved aside as the ice spreads about as quickly as your fingernails grow.

NASA’s unmanned New Horizons probe, launched in 2006, has traveled three billion miles for shots like these.

Data from this July 2015 flyby of the former planet, now an “ice dwarf,” was expected to finally finish uploading to Earth March 2017. (And you thought your Wi-Fi was slow.)

Answer: C. What appears here to be a bald spot ringed by red bumps is actually a moving mosaic of 30-mile-wide ice islands, perpetually rising and sinking from a reservoir deep below Pluto’s surface.

The bumps?

Frozen crust, shoved aside as the ice spreads about as quickly as your fingernails grow.

NASA’s unmanned New Horizons probe, launched in 2006, has traveled three billion miles for shots like these.

Data from this July 2015 flyby of the former planet, now an “ice dwarf,” was expected to finally finish uploading to Earth March 2017. (And you thought your Wi-Fi was slow.)

Answer: C. What appears here to be a bald spot ringed by red bumps is actually a moving mosaic of 30-mile-wide ice islands, perpetually rising and sinking from a reservoir deep below Pluto’s surface.

The bumps?

Frozen crust, shoved aside as the ice spreads about as quickly as your fingernails grow.

NASA’s unmanned New Horizons probe, launched in 2006, has traveled three billion miles for shots like these.

Data from this July 2015 flyby of the former planet, now an “ice dwarf,” was expected to finally finish uploading to Earth March 2017. (And you thought your Wi-Fi was slow.)

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