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Removing gauze from a bleeding wound

Removing gauze from a bleeding wound
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If the pad soaks through, don’t pick it up and replace it, says emergency medical services expert, Chris Cebollero. Clotting factors in the blood surface to help stop the bleeding; picking up the old gauze can remove them and make the wound start bleeding all over again.

Do this instead: add a fresh piece of gauze on top, advises Cebollero. If the gauze does come off, apply pressure to the cut until the bleeding stops, then rinse the wound out (to prevent infection), apply an antibiotic ointment (if not allergic), and rewrap with a bandage.

Not seeking care after a car accident

Not seeking care after a car accident
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“Your adrenaline-fuelled, fight-or-flight response can mask pain initially,” says Cebollero. “It can be ten minutes or two hours after the accident before you feel something.” Responders at the scene can’t necessarily rule out brain bleeds or broken bones.

Do this instead: if you have severe car damage, get checked out at the hospital, even if you feel fine.

Interested in natural pain relief?  Here are some ways to manage chronic pain without drugs.

Making it hard for paramedics to find you

Making it hard for paramedics to find you
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If you’re stung by a bee in your backyard and are having a serious allergic reaction, don’t lay down in the backyard to wait for help. Choking in a restaurant? Don’t run to the bathroom. If you choke in the bathroom because you don’t want to disturb others, people might not know or be able to call help.

Do this instead: in the case of an allergic reaction or serious injury, first have someone call 000. Then head to the driveway – or have an uninjured person go there – to meet the ambulance. Stay where people can help you.

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Source: RD.com

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