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You don’t clean the natural way

You don’t clean the natural way
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But perhaps the safest way to clean is to avoid cleaning products altogether. Steinemann advises using “vinegar, baking soda, hot water, a cut lemon or a cut orange, airing things out, sunshine, and ventilation.” Maker says that plain soap and water is enough for most jobs. In addition, there are some products you don’t need to use, ever. “Avoid conventional drain cleaners – ingredients in them can be caustic – and use a drain snake instead,” Geller says. In addition, “furniture polishes can leave sticky residues which attract dirt and dust,” she says. “Use your own DIY polish using olive oil and lemon juice.”

These are the things you should never clean with baking soda.

You’re not wearing protective gear

You’re not wearing protective gear
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Definitely wear a mask, gloves, and even goggles when cleaning – depending on what task you’re doing. “Gloves can be very helpful to protect the skin, and goggles may be imperative to protect the eyes when working with chemicals,” Dr Caudle says. When dusting, Geller says, “wear a face mask or respirator labelled N95 or P100; they’re available at most hardware stores and they filter 95 to 100 percent of particulates.” For general cleaning, Maker says she doesn’t usually use protective gear, but it’s perfect for more intense jobs like those you might do for spring cleaning. “If you’re cleaning out a crawl space, or an attic, or something that’s super dusty it makes sense to wear protective gear,” she says. Plus, “use gloves if you’re using really hot water and you want to protect your hands; if you’re changing a vacuum filter and you have dust allergies, wearing a mask is a great idea.”

You don’t follow the instructions

You don’t follow the instructions
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Cleaning might seem obvious, but you really should read the product instructions so you know you’re not putting yourself in harm’s way. “Always follow proper dosing and dilution instructions as recommended by the manufacturer,” Geller says. Using more won’t necessarily get you better results; in fact, “it leaves behind residues and exposes you and your family to a higher concentration of chemicals in the home,” says Geller.

It is important to read the warning labels on products to know the safe way to use them, and also for first aid instructions if exposure occurs. Maker notes that the product instructions will also let you know the amount of “dwell time” it needs to actually get rid of germs.

You’re risking a strain

You’re risking a strain
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Cleaning is a physical task, and if you’re not careful, or if you overdo it during a spring cleaning spree, it can have physical consequences. “Injuries can happen when cleaning and doing work around the house,” Dr Caudle says. “Lifting items that are too heavy, or lifting improperly, can cause back pain; falls may happen when climbing ladders or step-stools while cleaning; muscle strains or sprains can happen with excessive or strenuous cleaning; plus, carpal tunnel can occur or be exacerbated with repetitive motions.” Don’t take unnecessary risks, ask for help if you need it, and take breaks so you don’t get worn out.

These daily habits will keep your muscles strong.

You miss points of contact

You miss points of contact
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With spring cleaning, you might be focused on big jobs that don’t get done that often. Just don’t overlook the germy places hiding in plain sight. “I call ‘points of contact’ anything that people touch frequently: doorknobs, light switch plates, drawer pulls, or any handle. Basically, anywhere hands are going to go and where you could cough and then touch,” Maker says. “If someone comes over who’s got a cold and he’s touching things and then you touch those things, you’ll get sick.”

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Source: RD.com 

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