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Depression can have physical symptoms

Depression can have physical symptoms
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“One of the main symptoms that gets people asking for help has nothing to do with mood at all. Many people with depression have physical symptoms like backaches, headaches, stomach aches and sleep problems, that are the reason they eventually go to the doctor. After ruling out physical reasons for their symptoms, they are ultimately diagnosed with depression.” – Dr Susan Fletcher.

Read on for the science-backed ways to overcome depression naturally.

Depression isn’t necessarily caused by a chemical imbalance

Depression isn’t necessarily caused by a chemical imbalance
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“We’ve seen this theory presented to us in advertisements on television for many years. While biochemistry certainly can play a role in depression, it’s impossible to say whether it is a cause of depression, or an effect based on changes in your life situation and/or environment, your behaviours and thoughts, while feeling depressed. We also know that the brain is very complex, so that many different neurotransmitters or ‘brain chemicals” play a role in influencing, and being influenced by, our emotions.” – Psychologist, Dr Simon Rego.

A change of scenery can help

A change of scenery can help
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“A person’s mood changes from place to place. One of the most important treatments for depression is having people change their locations much more often than was necessary before the depression started. Depression convinces a person to withdraw from the world. The best treatment for this problem is to increase the variety of places a person visits, and increase the frequency with which they get out of their usual spots.” – Psychologist, Dr R. Wolf Shipon.

Depression won’t go away on its own

Depression won’t go away on its own
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“A mental illness cannot be willed away or brushed aside with a change in attitude. Ignoring the problem doesn’t give it the slip either. Depression in mild forms can deteriorate into more serious forms if left untreated. Depression is a serious but treatable illness, with a success rates of more than 70 per cent for those who seek intervention. Some think therapy will take forever, but it won’t. There are genetic tests that help target successful antidepressant medications that help speed recovery. And with proper treatment (talk therapy and medication), you’ll begin to feel a reduction of symptoms within weeks.” – Psychologist, Dr Deborah Serani.

Find out how walking meditation can improve your mental health.

Family history can predict depression

Family history can predict depression
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“Family history can play a crucial role in depression. A genetic predisposition can increase your chances of being depressed. Also, having depressed attitudes modelled for you throughout your life provides a framework for how you develop your own perspective. Because these attitudes are learned, they can also be unlearned and relearned – it just takes time.” – Psychologist, Dr Jessica Koblenz.

Depression is like being stuck in a rut

Depression is like being stuck in a rut
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“The depressed person, due to the way brain operates in depression, become unable to see new solutions to problems, and they focus overly on negatives. They tend to ruminate on what is wrong in their lives, and such brooding increases mental ‘stuckness.’ Depression can be helped by medication and yet it may be helped without medication if the depressed person will seek psychotherapy, which is very effective. Medication alone is easy but does not teach people how to cope with the situations that may have created the depression in the first place.” – Psychologist, Dr Margaret Wehrenberg.

Here are some ways to stop the incredible damage of negative self-talk.

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People who suffer from depression aren’t weak

People who suffer from depression aren’t weak
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“Many people mistakenly believe that if you can’t see it like you can a broken bone, it must be less significant and therefore can be overcome by simply using willpower. If not, they mistakenly believe that people who suffer from depression are weak. But mental health disorders are real, significant, and common. We need to do a much better job of looking out for people with depression, educating the public to take them seriously and to understand how important it is to get connected with a licensed mental health professional for help. Because great help exists, if people are willing to seek it out.” – Psychologist, Dr Simon Rego.

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Source: RD.com

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