Advertisement

10. You’re not the only one

10. You’re not the only one
Getty Images

Millions of women can’t control that “gotta go” feeling (urge incontinence) or leak during exercise or when they sneeze or cough (stress incontinence) and this risk increases after menopause.

“It’s common but not normal, and any leaking of urine should be evaluated and treated,” Dr. Moore says.

11. Your menopause symptoms could be a relationship issue

11. Your menopause symptoms could be a relationship issue
Getty Images

Women who are emotionally abused by a spouse or partner may suffer from more menopausal symptoms than their counterparts in healthier relationships.

Specifically, one in five women in the study of more than 2,000 women at mid-life and older had suffered emotional abuse by a current or former partner; these women had 50 percent higher odds of night sweats and 60 percent higher odds of painful sex.

“The data shows that experience of domestic violence and emotional abuse, sexual assault and clinically significant PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) symptoms are common, and may affect women’s health across the lifespan,” says author Carolyn Gibson, PhD, a clinical research psychologist affiliated with the University of California at San Francisco’s Department of Psychiatry..

12. The triple threat is real

12. The triple threat is real
Getty Images

Smoking, diabetes and high blood pressure are all bad for the heart, but they may be even worse for women’s hearts, new research shows.

Of 472,000 Britons aged 40 to 69, women experienced the highest increase in heart attack risk – though both sexes suffered.

Specifically, male smokers had more than twice the risk of heart attack than men who had never smoked, and women smokers had more than three times the risk of heart attack compared to never-smokers.

This same trend was seen with high blood pressure and diabetes. Good news though; here’s what happens to your body as soon as you quit smoking.

13. Your sleeping position matters

13. Your sleeping position matters
Getty Images

Stomach and side sleeping positions can cause wrinkles over time, and this effect gets worse as you age thanks to the natural thinning of your skin, according to a study in Aesthetic Surgery Journal.

Most sleep wrinkles can be seen on the forehead, lips, and cheeks.

If you can tolerate it, sleeping on your back can help slow the wrinkles.

14. Dementia is not a given

14. Dementia is not a given
Getty Images

More than one-third of dementia cases could be prevented or significantly delayed by addressing lifestyle-based risk factors such as learning to eat right and engaging in regular exercise, according to the US-based health initiative Be Brain Powerful: A Campaign for Women’s Brain Health.

15. Alzheimer’s is a woman’s issue

15. Alzheimer’s is a woman’s issue
Getty Images

Almost two-thirds of people with Alzheimer’s are women, and more than 60 percent of Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers are women, according to Jill Lesser, the president of Women Against Alzheimer’s.

“Women are very interested in brain health and very aware of brain health and the issues surrounding cognitive decline, but are very confused about what to do about it and still very scared,” she says.

Advertisement

16. Keep up with the girls nights

16. Keep up with the girls nights
Getty Images

Staying engaged with friends and connected to a community can help prevent cognitive decline, Lesser says.

“There is an increasing amount of evidence that community engagement can protect the brain so try to do activities – such as eating and exercising – with others.”

17. You really are what you eat

17. You really are what you eat
Getty Images

Planning a healthy diet that’s rich in good fats, dark leafy greens, berries and fish may help protect your noggin, Lesser says. Diets that limit carbs can also boost brain health. “Your brain needs healthy fats, and fewer sugars and carbs.” Talk to your doctor or a dietitian about what style of eating is best for you.

Surprisingly, it also turns out that WHEN you eat is just as important.

18. Stick to a bedtime

18. Stick to a bedtime
Getty Images

Most of us haven’t had a real bedtime since childhood, but Dr. Moore says it’s time to re-institute one.

“Getting adequate sleep is highly underappreciated as a health issue in women after 50, and setting and sticking to a regular bedtime can help make sure you are getting enough – just like it did when you were a kid.”

The Office on Women’s Health in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that women aged 50 and older get at least seven to eight hours of sleep per night.

19. Vaccinations aren’t just for kids

19. Vaccinations aren’t just for kids
Getty Images

Women over 50 should get a flu shot yearly and talk to their doctor about other vaccines, such as those for pneumonia and herpes-zoster (shingles).

“Your doctor can tell you which vaccines you need after 50,” Dr. Moore says.

Never miss a deal again - sign up now!

Connect with us: