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Home remedies for back pain: cold

Home remedies for back pain: cold
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Icing is key when you are experiencing lower back soreness and/or pain, shares Dr Jennifer L. Solomon. “It is also critical post-exercise to reduce inflammation and promote pain control.”  If you are experiencing radiating pain into the lower extremities, continue to ice the lower back rather than the legs, she says.

Home remedies for back pain: heat

Home remedies for back pain: heat
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Heat should be your go-to after a weekend warrior move gone wrong, such as over-aggressive mulching in your garden or an injury from moving furniture, says orthopaedic spine surgeon, Dr Justin J. Park. “Strains and pulls respond better to heat.” Heat helps to ease the strained muscle and reduce tension and can help to increase range of motion and reduce pain.  Don’t let the heating pad get too hot and don’t use it for more than an hour or so at a time.

Home remedies for back pain: over-the-counter medications

Home remedies for back pain: over-the-counter medications
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Other back pain remedies that work fast are over-the-counter pain medication, Dr Park says.  Paracetamol, or acetaminophen, is really not recommended for muscular strains and sprains. If you’ve hurt your back, the best remedy is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, or NSAID. Common NSAIDs include Advil (ibuprofen) and Aleve (naproxen). These medications help to stem the tide of the blood flow to the area to reduce pain. By keeping inflammation low, your pain is decreased, and you are better able to move.

These simple strategies will help to prevent and ease back pain.

Home remedies for back pain: rest

Home remedies for back pain: rest
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Rest is vital when you are trying to relieve back pain naturally. “We aren’t talking about bed rest though,” Dr Park says. Take two or three days off from your usual activities such as going to the gym, which could make the pain worse and lead to further injury of the musculature of the back.  But gentle stretching and light walking should be okay, he adds. In fact, exercise is thought to be beneficial in terms of preventing and relieving chronic low back pain. For example, a 2018 review of randomised controlled trials, which was published in the American Journal of Epidemiology, found that people who exercised had a 33 per cent lower risk of back pain than those who did not. And in people who did get lower back pain, exercise reduced the severity and disability associated with it. The researchers recommended strengthening with either stretching or aerobic exercise 2 to 3 days per week.

Read on to learn about some science-backed natural home remedies for arthritis pain relief.

Home remedies for back pain: muscle creams and patches

Home remedies for back pain: muscle creams and patches
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Another way to cure back pain at home is to use muscle creams and patches. Many different companies make these products. The medication in the patch or cream works to “confuse” the nerve endings in your back muscles. By making them feel hot or cold, they are distracted from the pain of the muscle tissue. In addition, the heat from these patches goes a long way toward soothing the muscles that have been strained or sprained. Large patches are probably more convenient, but creams may work better if your muscles are strained higher up on the back, to the side, or over a large area.

Home remedies for back pain: try a rub

Home remedies for back pain: try a rub
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There are a host of over-the-counter and prescription pain relieving gels, Dr Park says.  “Over-the-counter rubs provide relief, and prescription strength anti-inflammatory creams are great for people who can’t tolerate taking them by mouth,” he says. Ask a loved one to massage the cream into your back if you can’t reach the sore spot.

 

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Home remedies for back pain: know when to call in the doctor

Home remedies for back pain: know when to call in the doctor
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Self-treating with home remedies for back pain makes sense to a point, says Dr Park. “Give it a week or two but if after a few weeks, your pain is not getting better, getting worse or is severe at night, see a doctor to find out what else may help.”

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Source: RD Canada

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