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1. Food

1. Food
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As they age, pets require a different set of vitamins and minerals.

Different sizes and breeds will have different needs, so ask your vet for guidance.

Most pet food brands have a senior range, which will usually include more omega 3, 6 and 9 for bones and joints.

2. Exercise

2. Exercise
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Encourage your pet to continue their outdoor activities.

The sights and smells should inspire their natural urge to trot about and explore.

If they’re reluctant, start small with indoor games and toys that will keep their mind active and get them moving a bit at least.

3. Fit not fat

3. Fit not fat
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If you’re feeding your pet healthy food in appropriate-sized portions and making sure they’re getting exercise, they shouldn’t be overweight.

But if they do need to lose a few kilos, talk to your vet about the best way to maintain a healthy weight.

Excess weight places stress on your pet’s joints and internal organs.

4. Check-ups

4. Check-ups
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Regular visits to the vet can prevent minor health issues, including dental problems, flaring up and escalating.

Older pets should be taken at least once every six months.

On your next visit, ask what common issues may affect their particular breed, such as arthritis or diabetes.

5. Toothache

5. Toothache
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Plaque and tartar build-up can lead to gingivitis, which allows bacteria to reach the bloodstream where it can damage internal organs. Use pet dental chews or brush their teeth at home. Book an annual professional clean.

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