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The world’s cutest couch potatoes

The world’s cutest couch potatoes
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Having a dog that requires lots of exercise can be a powerful motivator for your own exercise program, but not everyone is looking for a four-legged fitness coach. That’s where these adorably lazy-dog breeds come in, and you might be surprised to find they come in all shapes and sizes. Some, such as the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, were specifically bred to be lapdogs. Others, such as the Great Dane, have been bred to grow so large, they simply don’t have the physical structure to support lots of activity. Still others, including the Bulldog, have been bred with flat noses, which makes prolonged physical activity difficult.

Of course, if you’re looking for your own four-legged snuggle-buddy, you’ll want to bear in mind that not all dogs of a particular breed are exactly the same, and, of course, even the laziest breeds still require some exercise for their physical and mental health.

With that in mind, check out this list to find out which lazy-dog breed is the perfect one for you.

Shih Tzu

Shih Tzu
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This dog breed was developed by Tibetan monks as a gift for members of Chinese royalty. Their purpose was to adorn the laps of said members of royalty. When not napping, Shih Tzus tend to spend their time seeking out cuddles, pets, scratches and tickles. So, just how little exercise does a Shih Tzu desire or need? According to veterinarian Jay Scott, , founder of the pug-centric website Pugsquest, this dog will probably be happy simply wandering around the house and going outside for the occasional bathroom break.

If you’re looking for a pint-sized pup, consider these other adorably small dog breeds that start small and stay small.

Pekingese

Pekingese
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Similar to the Shih Tzu, the Pekingese was bred as a lapdog for royalty. With its compact, stocky body and “adorably squashed face,” as Dr Scott puts it, the Pekingese is not well suited for high-energy activity – or much activity at all, for that matter. Instead, the Pekingese tends to spend the greater part of its day napping, and requires no more than 20 minutes of physical activity each day (and that includes a walk to relieve itself).

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
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Another dog bred for sitting on royal laps, the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel has no issue spending the bulk of its time just laying around and being adored by its people, says Dr Perez-Camargo – despite the fact that the Cav’s roots hark back to hunting, at least among the British royal family. Cavs can often be seen in portraits of British royals, including King Charles II, who gave this adorably lazy dog breed its name. One of the most famous in history was Dash, the beloved canine bestie of Queen Victoria, who kept her company during her childhood at Kensington Palace and was with her when she became queen.

Take a look at these 30 awesome dog breeds you’ve never heard of – until now.

Chihuahua

Chihuahua
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When talking about lazy dog breeds, it’s worth mentioning the Chihuahua, which is most content just “hanging around” with its people, according to veterinarian Jamie Richardson. It’s not that the Chihuahua is “lazy”, which is to say disinterested in activity. It’s just that the Chihuahua is so tiny, it would take at least 10 steps to match each one of ours. So, high-energy or low-energy, the Chihuahua is likely to get tired of walking long before its people do. And that makes the Chihuahua exceptionally low maintenance, if not truly “lazy”.

Basset Hound

Basset Hound
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Like the Cavalier King Charles Spaniel, the Basset Hound was bred with royal hunting in mind (in this case, French royals). Low to the ground and with big, floppy ears that act as airflow conductors, the Basset is a talented tracker. But its elongated, chubby body and almost comically short legs make it difficult to run or even walk for long distances. Of course, that helps makes the Basset Hound ideal for anyone with a penchant for lazy-dog breeds. That being said, it’s important to mind the Basset’s diet and provide some daily exercise in order to prevent obesity and obesity-related health problems such as arthritis, points out veterinarian Sarah Wooten.

Did you know, that if your dog is this colour, it could live longer. Find out here.

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Greyhound

Greyhound
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Another hunting dog that’s known for its almost shocking levels of laziness is the Greyhound. “Based on its lean, long-legged build, most people assume the Greyhound is anything but lazy,” says Dr Perez-Camargo, but that would not be true. “As athletic as they look, adult Greyhounds are couch potatoes who can spend as much as 18 hours a day sleeping.” So, while Greyhounds can run at speeds of up to 70km per hour, don’t count on them for any sort of long-distance trekking.

If you are looking for a dog to run with, check out some of the world’s fastest dog breeds.

British Bulldog

British Bulldog
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“Bulldogs are known for two things – their cute wrinkles and snoring,” says veterinarian Sara Ochoa. Since they spend about 90% of their time sleeping, that’s a lot of snoring. Some of the British Bulldog’s apparent laziness can be attributed to its stocky build, and some of it can be attributed to its flat nose and subsequent breathing difficulties. The bottom line is that the British Bulldog is one of the laziest of lazy-dog breeds. But like other lazy-dog breeds, the British Bulldog still requires some exercise for mental stimulation and to avoid obesity-related health issues.

Great Dane

Great Dane
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The Great Dane is one of the largest dog breeds in the world. It’s also classed as a ‘working dog’, which implies it likes to get stuff done. But it turns out that what Great Danes like getting done is sitting around and watching over their people. “The Great Dane is more of a nanny dog than a retriever or even a playmate,” says Dr Scott, who adds that “owing to their rapid growth and huge size, too much exercise could cause bone and joint problems.” In other words, laziness isn’t just a lifestyle choice for your average Great Dane, it’s a matter of health!

Chow Chow

Chow Chow
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“For pet parents looking to snuggle with real-life teddy bears, look no further than the Chow Chow,” says Dr Perez-Camargo, who explains that due to their straight hind legs and extraordinarily thick coat, agile movement can be difficult for this quintessential lazy-dog breed. It also helps that the Chow Chow was originally bred to act as a palace guard. As a result, Chow Chows have evolved to be very devoted to their people, as well as quiet and reserved in nature. How reserved, you might ask? To help you understand just how chill the Chow Chow can be, Dr Scott says that its behaviour is often compared to that of a cat.

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