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50s focus: Leg strength

50s focus: Leg strength
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“Your legs are the base support for your frame but also are the strongest and biggest muscles of the body,” says Ryan. Training those big muscles can help save your brain: Research published in the journal Gerontology linked increased leg power to slower cognitive ageing. “Brains aged better both structurally and functionally with stronger legs,” says Ryan, although the reason is unclear. In addition to strength and cardio work, Ryan recommends incorporating sports like tennis.

Here are 30 amazing facts about your brain that will blow your mind.

50s focus: Discover walking

50s focus: Discover walking
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If you’ve been running through your last few decades, you might want to ease the wear and tear on your joints by shifting over to power walks. “By this age, many have experienced some sort of injury that has limited their ability to exercise,” says Straub. Not to worry – now is the time to try walking, especially if you have bad knees. While it might take you longer to complete a given distance, walking can be just as effective as running when it comes to lowering your risk of certain diseases, according to the American Heart Association.

Here are 11 easy ways to make walking more fun.

The 60s workout

The 60s workout
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If you feel like your energy is slipping away, exercise can solve your problem, says Straub. Your 60s are the most important time in your life to exercise, she stresses. “Do what you can and aim for exercises that improve (or maintain) your independence,” she says. “If you can simply walk consistently for cardio, perform bodyweight exercises [like situps, pushups, and wall sits], and attend a Pilates or yoga class one to two days a week, you will be far ahead of most seniors.” Consistency is key, as is maintaining proper form in everything you do. “Now is not the time to go compete with the youth and take on high-intensity exercises that can lead to irreversible damage,” Straub adds.

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60s focus: Reduce the impact

60s focus: Reduce the impact
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“Minimal-impact training minimises ground force and focuses more on resistance without damaging the musculoskeletal system,” explains Shapiro. “Exercises include swimming, rowing, using the elliptical machine, spinning and stationary core exercises.” Because any of these workouts will strengthen your body’s aerobic system and core, they’re essential for this age group, whose certain organ functions are more prone to slowing down.

Here are 11 things you didn’t know could slow down ageing.

60s focus: Work your muscles

60s focus: Work your muscles
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Ryan says women in their 60s can especially benefit from lifting weights twice a week. Research published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society revealed that older women who engaged in strength and resistance training had fewer lesions in the white matter of their brains – a sign that their memory and other mental functions were holding up better. Those who strength-trained only once a week didn’t see the same benefits. “Strong is smart and smart is strong,” adds Ryan.

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The 70s workout

The 70s workout
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Both men and women would benefit from bodyweight training with assistance – see a fitness trainer, look into resistance bands, or try the TRX suspension system, says Shapiro. “Balance exercises that work with coordination help both men and women in this age range maintain independence, strength, cognitive awareness and … mobility,” he adds. He advises giving yourself ample time for recovery between exercises. Aim to get low-impact cardio at least three times a week.

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70s focus: Pursue lower impact exercises

70s focus: Pursue lower impact exercises
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According to Shapiro, both men and women can benefit from bodyweight training with assistance (such as the TRX suspension system) and re-training the core musculature. “Balance exercises that work with coordination help both men and women in this age range maintain independence, strength, cognitive awareness and improve mobility,” he says. “Just remember that your cardiovascular levels aren’t as high here as they were in your 60s, so give ample time for recovery between exercises or sets of movement.”

70s focus: Stick with safe cardiovascular movements

70s focus: Stick with safe cardiovascular movements
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During this decade and going forward, Ryan suggests practicing safe cardio moves that help minimise visceral fat, the deadly fat that accumulates around your midsection. And don’t stop strength training, which can improve your balance and protect against falls, helping preserve your independence. “Focus on building strong shoulders, spine and core,” he says. Plus, keep your legs strong – along with your heart and lungs – with regular walks or hikes, which will help aid brain function, keep you lean and trim and prevent injuries, says Ryan.

Learn what your walking style can reveal about your health.

The 80s workout

The 80s workout
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Nearly any activity you do will be good for your mind and body. Resistance training, for one, becomes essential, as it can help maintain your muscle strength. Consider hopping on a strength-training machine at your local gym, such as leg extension or cable pull.

Now find out the simple rules you need to follow to live to 100!

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Source: RD.com

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