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Be nice to your belly

 Be nice to your belly
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With all the food temptations out there – fast food, baked goods – it’s easy to tax your tummy with some poor choices. But even if you’re eating healthy food, some of the high-fibre choices can do a number on your digestive tract. Check out our experts’ advice on keeping your stomach happy.

Carb-dense foods

Carb-dense foods
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Mention “carbs” and the word is bound to create a buzz. The reality is that not all carbs are bad, though. Dr Aviva Romm, an integrative women’s health specialist, says that complex carbs like sweet potatoes, squash, and brown rice – so long as they’re not eaten in excess – are beneficial in keeping belly fat down. “The real problem,” she says, “is when you eat simple carbs – things like processed flour products such as white bread or white rice.” Dr Romm explains that unlike complex carbs, which makes good use of energy and blood sugar levels, simple carbs cause sugar and insulin spikes. Eating these foods regularly for long periods of time may lead to obesity, insulin resistance, inflammation and more.

Found in: bagels, white rice, white pasta, white breads, donuts, muffins.

Check out these high-protein, low-carb foods to help you lose weight.

Unhealthy fats

Unhealthy fats
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Three types of dietary fat are linked to inflammation and thus contribute to excess belly fat:  trans fats, saturated fats, and omega-6 fats.

The fact that trans fats are still around is an issue beyond belly troubles. For example, experts at the Mayo Clinic explain that trans fats, commonly found in baked goods and fried foods, can increase your risk of heart disease. Dr Romm says that good quality fats like olive oil and avocado are ideal. These fats, she explains, are not only beneficial for healthy cellular function but play a role in keeping you from overeating.

Found in: packaged foods (trans fats); processed and high-fat cuts of meat, full-fat dairy, some candy (saturated fat); corn oil, grape-seed oil, soybean oil, safflower oil, sunflower oil (omega-6 fats).

Processed meat

Processed meat
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Though tasty, processed meats are very high in kilojoules and saturated fats. It’s not only bad for your stomach, but it can also lead to heart disease and stroke. “Processed meats are very difficult for many people to digest. They can sit in the intestines for longer because they are difficult to break down,” says, warns dietitian, Julie Rothenberg. They don’t contain any fibre, so they aren’t good for digestion.

Found in: cold cuts, hot dogs, minced meats.

Fried foods

Fried foods
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Fried food tends to overwhelm the stomach, resulting in acid reflux and heartburn. Rothenberg says that fried foods sit in your stomach similarly to processed foods. It takes the body much longer to digest fried foods due to their high-fat content, making them foods that cause belly fat.

Wondering what foods are the worst for your heart? Find out here.

Milk and high-lactose dairy foods

Milk and high-lactose dairy foods
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According to the International Foundation for Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD), a key component to keeping your tummy happy is the avoidance of FODMAPs: fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides, and polyols. But all you need to remember is that basically, these are rapidly fermentable carbohydrates that can aggravate your gut. Some people aren’t sensitive to any FODMAPs, some experience symptoms after eating only certain ones, and other people develop gradually worsening effects with each exposure.

Lactose, found in all animal milk, is the best-known FODMAP. Lactose is broken down in the small intestine by an enzyme called lactase. Our bodies produce less lactase as we get older (since its main purpose is to help babies digest breast milk), which means dairy foods that contain lactose can torment our tummies over time even if they didn’t before. That may have to do with genetics; interestingly, the IFFGD says that insufficient lactase levels may be influenced by that as well as ethnicity, noting that almost 100 per cent of Asians and American Indians have low lactase levels and many gut disorders.

Found in: milk, regular (non-Greek) yoghurt, soft cheeses, dairy-based desserts.

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Excess fructose (in apples, honey, asparagus)

Excess fructose (in apples, honey, asparagus)
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Foods with a lot of fructose (another FODMAP) can contribute to gas, bloating, and diarrhoea – common irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) hallmarks. Research published in a 2015 issue of Medical Hypotheses explains that “fructose malabsorption” can intensify IBS symptoms, and is common among IBS patients. The good news? They note that “restricting fructose in the diet can lead to symptom improvement.”

Found in: certain fruits (apples, mangoes, watermelons); certain vegetables (asparagus, sugar snap peas); sweeteners (high-fructose corn syrup, agave nectar, honey).

Is Manuka really the healing honey? Read on to find out.

Garlic, onions, and high-fibre cousins

Garlic, onions, and high-fibre cousins
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Certain foods like onions, wheat, and garlic contain a kind of fibre called fructan. For some people, fructan is difficult to digest and can lead to flatulence. According to a 2014 issue of Current Gastroenterology Reports, restricting this fibre (you guessed it – another FODMAP) in your diet could reduce a range of GI disorders. Still, more research is needed as there are several factors that may be driving each person’s food intolerances.

Found in: grains (barley, wheat); vegetables (artichokes, onions, garlic); legumes (black beans, kidney beans, soybeans); additives (inulin).

Beans and nuts

Beans and nuts
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Beans, beans, they’re good for your heart. The more you eat them, the more you, well, have gas. All jokes about this longstanding rhyme aside, it holds significant truth. Nutrition experts at the Mayo Clinic explain that beans are a common gas-producing food, as is cabbage and broccoli. It all has to do with bacteria in the colon and the digestion or fermentation of undigested food. They suggest removing one food at a time to monitor when your gas improves. This way, you’ll discover the culprit and know to avoid certain items.

Found in: most beans and some nuts (cashews, pistachios).

Natural and artificial sweeteners

Natural and artificial sweeteners
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Sugar alcohols, low-carb sweeteners naturally found in some foods and added to others, are another FODMAP. Foods that contain them, therefore, are among the foods that cause belly fat that you should consider avoiding. FODMAPs don’t easily pass through our cell walls, so gut bacteria digest them, which can cause gas and bloat. Keep an eye out for mannitol in particular. Information from Yale-New Haven Health notes that the naturally-occurring sugar found in pineapples, carrots, and more can linger in your intestines for a while. The result? Uncomfortable bloat and diarrhoea.

Found in: some fruits (apples, blackberries, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums); vegetables (cauliflower, mushrooms, snow peas); artificial sweeteners (isomalt, mannitol, polydextrose); sugar-free foods.

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